Let’s Talk: Author Bio

Earlier this week, Steven Capps came on the blog and shared some helpful advice with us about honesty when it comes to publishing, awards, and credentials. He did a great job explaining the importance of the why we should be ethical and honest when using awards and sharing credentials in our bios, but I am sure some of us are wondering how to write a great Author Bio that will grab attention.

The best advice I can give is study what others are doing and practice. Don’t expect to be amazing at it on your first try. I can hear the groans now . . . Study? Practice? Yes. Do both.AxxLC pixabay pencil-1758275_1280

To help you in that department, I’ve compiled this short list of helpful articles on writing an author bio. Beware that not all advice is created equal, so be discerning and then work on that stuff I mentioned above. You know, our friends: Study and Practice.

How To Write an Author Bio

What other great resources have helped you write a great author bio?

Put a link in the comments and let us know. 

I haven’t taken the time, or made the effort, or spent the money I don’t have to participate in competitions, at least not seriously yet, so I don’t have all that cool stuff to add to my bio.

I will say on a personal/reader level, when it comes to an author bio, I rarely pay much attention to all the shiny stuff and am more interested in finding out about the actual person: what this author thinks, believes, and what he puts his mind, heart and effort into. That’s what interests me when I read a bio.

  • What reasons do you have for reading an author bio?
  • Is it work related, like it is for Steven?
  • How important is it that you see awards, education, and outside recognition?
  • What is the most obvious reason to you to have those things in an author bio and for what purposes?

Consider this your own little interview. I love having you here! Please leave a comment and let’s chat. 🙂


11 thoughts on “Let’s Talk: Author Bio

  1. Honesty in a bio? Who would have thought?

    Seriously, there are authors who lie in their bio? I guess I shouldn’t be surprised, but I kind of am. That’s ridiculous. Why? And don’t they think that might catch up with them at some point? And, no, I usually don’t pay attention to the “shiny” stuff. I like fun (or serious) bios where authors tell me something unique or interesting. Or just that they raise chickens and really, really love broccoli. Whatever. 🙂

    I must say I didn’t practice mine. I was getting so stressed trying to think about what to write it that I dictated something silly into my phone. Wrote it up. Put it in my book. Done. (My blurb is another story…)

    Liked by 2 people

        1. Thanks Sarah. Some day maybe I’ll be satisfied and leave well enough alone. 🙂 I am soooo glad you like them. These are definitely my favorite yet, and I think they style is something I can continue throughout the rest of the series without it getting too boring or difficult. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

    1. You are welcome, Jan! I hope the links offer advice that you find helpful. I’m sorry to say that it’s difficult to find articles that talk specifically about writing a bio without the flashy awards or references to education background and prior publication. In the eyes of some people, it’s a failing, so further advice is definitely don’t do what I do. Go and submit some short stories to competitions, try to get your own articles published elsewhere. Eventually those can be added to a bio and spruce it up for the pros we query. Something that is mentioned here and there when writing a bio for querying is to keep it brief, but if you don’t have educational or award credentials then to highlight personal experience that makes it evident that you are at least somewhat of an expert with the content you are offering. I hope that’s helpful to anyone reading this! 🙂 Thank you for commenting, Jan! I wish you great success with your book proposal!

      Liked by 1 person

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